Meet Terry, a 2019 dress designer

 

Terry Murillo
The advocates were my inspiration. This was my first year participating in the Dressember campaign as an advocate. I was so encouraged with the posts of all the amazing things being done in their dresses. I wanted to use Dressember’s slogan, “You Can Do Anything In A Dress” as my guide.
— Terry Murillo

Last winter, we held our third annual Dressember Advocate Design Challenge, giving our community the opportunity to pick a winning dress design. Terry Murillo’s t-shirt dress took the prize and is now being brought to life in our 2019 collection. Terry is a natural born teacher and maker. She lives in Southern California where she lives with her husband. They have been adventurously married 30 years strong, and we have three amazing adult children as well a son and daughter-in-love(law). As she enters a season of empty nesting, after having had homeschooled for 27 years, she is revisiting a lot of things she placed on the shelf. Terry has a certification in nutrition and a BA in Ministry and enjoy helping people live their best life. Let’s learn more about Terry and why she designed her dress the way she did.

Why did you design your dress the way you did?

The advocates were my inspiration. This was my first year participating in the Dressember campaign as an advocate. I was so encouraged with the posts of all the amazing things being done in their dresses. I wanted to use Dressember's slogan, You Can Do Anything In A Dress as my guide. I felt a button down (or up, you do you) would be great for movement. Pockets were a must, because pockets! I thought of a collar feature for the professionals; ties, scarves, vests, but then, throw a crew neck over it and you’re too cool for school. Long sleeves for the colder places, I was raised in Denver, the chill is real. I also really wanted to keep in mind the many advocates who choose to use the same dress all month.

Why does Dressember’s mission of a world without slavery resonate with you?

I first heard of the term human trafficking when I moved to Costa Mesa in 2012 and heard a news report of a girl that was rescued from human trafficking in a home in Orange County with the help of Vanguard University's Global Center for Women & Justice. My two eldest children were attending VU at the time. I decided to do some research and once I knew what it was, I also knew that it was now my responsibility to bring awareness by participating in the conversations. I started to follow non-profits and justice enterprises who were doing their part in fighting for the freedom of men, women, boys, girls and even families around the world. In April of 2018 I brought together as many as I could and held a Pop-Up Shop in Los Angeles to bring awareness, and funds, and my youngest daughter held a Bra Drive at her school, Azusa Pacific, for Free The Girls. I believe everybody can do something, with our voice, with our dollar, with our wardrobe.

What is something you’re proud of right now?

I have learned the power of a day. To live life to it fullest by living one day at a time. I wanted to share the freedom of that with others, so I am currently designing an undated planner and hope to have it available for sale before the year ends. I also have a small clothing brand, I am developing of upcycled pieces. So be on the look out for WVN Apparel, in Early 2020.

Anything else you’d like to share with us?

"The Lord loves seeing justice on the earth. Anywhere and everywhere you can find his faithful, unfailing love!" - Psalms 33:5 (The Passion Translation) I pray you find a healthy balance of staying socially responsible and the recipient of God's grace and love.

Connect with Terry:

I run a small awareness organization that provides knowledge and opportunities for people to do wonderful things for wonderful people. On the website I also have a blog. My Instagram account is @dowanderfulthings and my personal account is @terrylouise_ifyouplease. If you ever need a music video, commercial, short film, documentary produced my family has a production company.


Sketch by Samantha Pilon

Sketch by Samantha Pilon