Posts tagged Fashion Friday
A Review of DoneGood: A One-Stop Shop for Ethical Shopping

DoneGood was born out of the idea that this purchasing power could be harnessed and used to create good for people and the planet. Through aggregating data from ethical certifiers like Fair Trade and B Lab, as well as conducting research of their own, DoneGood discovers ethical brands and features them and their products on the DoneGood platforms. Schwarz says their goal is to “create a one-stop shop” where consumers can go to find an ethically-produced version of whatever it is they’re looking for. In the four years since DoneGood started, they’ve partnered with over 300 ethical brands and helped divert over $500,000 of consumer dollars to them.

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How to shop ethically for your kids without breaking the bank

Two years ago, I was pregnant with my son and just beginning to navigate the world of ethical shopping practices. This meant that not only was I learning about all the baby gear I needed, I was also trying to figure out how I could make sure these products were fairly made. It was important to me that the clothes and toys I provided for my child didn’t come at the expense of someone else, but I felt completely at a loss as to how to do this and still stick to any kind of a budget. It’s taken a little work, and I’m still learning, but I’ve picked up a few tips in these last couple of years that have helped me make sure my purchases are both worker and budget friendly.

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How does ethical fashion play into human trafficking?

Fast fashion describes the rapid movement of inexpensive garments from the runway to the store in order to keep up with trends. It stocks stores with beautiful, on-trend items that are hard to say “no” to because of their low prices. But would we consider thinking twice before buying if we knew how that garment was made? If we were to meet the man or woman who made that article of clothing, talked to them about their salary or working conditions, and put ourselves in their shoes - would the $10 skirt be worth it?

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Thoughtfully Approaching Black Friday

80% of the hands making the clothes we wear every day are the hands of young women. The vast majority are between 18-24 years old, and these women go home with an average of $3 a day. This is, by definition, exploitation: “The action or fact of treating someone unfairly in order to benefit from their work.” We would not blink an eye at buying a shirt on sale for $13, much less $3, and yet for thousands of women, they are ill-treated and forced to live on amounts we cannot fathom.

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A Moment with Mel Murray of Joyn Bags

Here at Dressember we are excited to be entering into a unique collaboration with an organization that shares our passion for fashion and creating support for those that are oppressed and marginalized. JOYN started in 2011 from the vision of advocate and entrepreneur, Melody Murray, who spent a decade working with companies such as Procter and Gamble and Walmart. Moved by a desire to create locally owned and self sustaining businesses in marginalized communities, Mel and her family moved to rural Asia. 14 years later, JOYN employs hundreds of artisans and sells hundreds of thousands of bags a year. This fall, JOYN is joining in with the vision of Dressember by creating a line of hand-stamped accessories, (a tote, wallet and a clutch). Be sure to check out this beautifully crafted line on their website.

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Recognizing Women Workers in the Garment Industry

I grew up watching my mom sew. It was a hobby for herself as well as a job to support our family. I often look at her hands and wonder what pains she would have been dealt had she worked in a garment factory in Laos or Thailand - maybe long restless hours, low wages, and unsafe work conditions. I can only be thankful that her sewing career began in the United States, where the fight for change in the garment industry has already made its mark in American history. In 1909, the first National Women’s day took place in the United States, honoring the garment worker’s strike that took place a year before.

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A Beginners Guide to Capsule Wardrobes

I have to confess - it takes me a lot longer than necessary to put an outfit together in the morning, mostly because I have an overstuffed closet full of clothes, shoes, and accessories. After analyzing my wardrobe and daily routine, I realized that I was wasting valuable time and adding unwanted stress to my day. I don’t have a minimalist lifestyle, although it’s something I have considered, and maybe the effort of creating a capsule wardrobe will lead me to embrace minimalism. So, with that thought in mind and considering the following benefits, I embarked on a journey of creating my own capsule wardrobe.


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An Honest Review of ThredUp

A great alternative to purchasing from stores that may be engaging in forced labor is to shop secondhand. With more aspects of our lives undergoing the shift from physical to virtual, locating worthwhile thrift stores - and finding the time to visit them - is becoming increasingly challenging, not to mention the process of digging through unorganized racks of clothing in search of your size can be a frustrating and ultimately fruitless endeavor. This is where web-based secondhand clothing stores have begun to gain their relevance and popularity. One of such stores is thredUP, an extensive virtual marketplace that has been providing shoppers with easy access to women’s and children’s clothing and accessories since 2009, subsequently earning the title of the world’s largest online thrift and consignment store.


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A Look Inside the Cotton Industry

Over the past several months, though, I have learned about fast fashion, which is the term used for all the stylish pieces and designs that are constantly being pushed out by retailers for our consumption. The output is largely composed of cotton. Despite the increasing world consumption of the fiber (reaching around 100 million bales in 2016 alone), cotton producers feel enormous pressure to compete with lower-priced synthetic fibers. Therefore, they constantly search for cheaper labor to remain competitive in the market.


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The Root Collective: Walking out Vision in Deeply-Rooted Shoes

Bethany Tran, Founder and CEO of The Root Collective (TRC), wasn’t planning on using shoes to make a difference in poverty in the slums of La Limonada in Guatemala City. She just saw a problem: a seemingly unbreakable cycle of poverty and gang culture in the slums, with no one doing anything to solve it. In La Limonada, boys are often primed for gangs when they are young--sometimes younger than 10 years old--and it is almost impossible to leave a gang once you have joined.

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UNCVRD: Jewelry to End Slavery

Five years ago, Jen Bedrossian was just learning about the horrors of human trafficking and didn’t know what she could do to help stop it. “My eyes were opened, and I felt compelled to do something,” she says.

At the same time, Jen was considering starting her own business. She had studied ancient Roman archaeology and was now working at a museum. From an early age, Jen collected dozens of rocks, examining each one for the natural beauty it contained. For months, she tried to think of a way to join the fight to end human trafficking while pursuing a new, creative business venture.

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Fashion Without Harm: The Good on You Shopping App

When we made the decision to transition to more thoughtful, and ethical purchases as a family, the biggest challenge was knowing what brands to trust and which ones we needed to move away from in the future. Our process always started with identifying a need, then doing a great deal of online research to try and find a company that offered both a quality product and a transparent business model.

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Trades of Hope: Making empowerment a trend

Today, we're highlighting one of our amazing brand partners, Trades of Hope! We are committed to partnering with ethical brands and spotlighting them every Friday as a way to encourage us all to be better consumers. Enjoy our interview with Elisabeth Hujskens of Trades of Hope.

Trades of Hope co-founders, Gretchen Huijskens, Holly Wehde, Chelsie Antos and Elisabeth Huijskens had many reasons for launching Trades of Hope back in 2010.

For Elisabeth, the passion for other cultures and fighting poverty worldwide started at only 8 years old.

I started traveling multiple times a year to Haiti, where my family had started an orphanage and school,” Elisabeth said. “I grew up seeing first hand that poverty is an endless cycle and that charity work was not breaking that cycle. The community around our orphanage and school was not changing. It was still in poverty after 10 years.

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A Dressember Bow Tie Tutorial ft. Neck & Tie Co.

The beauty of the Dressember movement, and one of the reasons we chose to participate as a family is how the campaign empowers both women and men, young and old, in the fight against human trafficking. As a firefighter, a bow tie isn’t a part of my husband, Phil’s typical wardrobe, and we knew incorporating it into his daily life for a month would be difficult, but that it would also be worth it. We're showing you on the blog today how to tie a bow-tie and offering an incentive to participants pledging to wear a tie or bow-tie for Dressember.

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Sseko Designs: The Dreamers and the Do-ers

Advocacy, community, fashion, empowerment. You will find these phrases strewn throughout the Dressember Campaign, and rightly so. These words can also be used to describe Sseko Designs, a social enterprise sandals, accessories, and handbags business that helps women in East Africa pursue their dreams of education. It all started back in 2008, when founder Liz Bohannon traveled to Uganda and was moved to action by the stories of her new friends. These young women Liz met were bright, recent high school graduates, who had dreams of becoming doctors, business owners, leaders, and more. Unfortunately, due to exploitation, poverty, and gender inequality present in the country, it seemed unlikely that they would find a way to make these dreams become a reality. It was this experience that inspired Liz to get involved, and in 2010, Sseko Designs was founded.

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interview with Tasha Kendall of How we soul

In the midst of the most beautiful island scenes on Maui, you’ll find world-changer Tasha Kendall, founder and CEO of How We Soul, dreaming and thoughtfully designing your next pair of leggings. These ethically made, eco-friendly pieces of art, derived from an idea planted in Tasha’s heart more than 17 years ago during a teaching opportunity in Botswana. Fast forward to 2015, where Tasha used her athletic background, creativity and passion for others to birth How We Soul. Today, 100% of their proceeds after production costs support the Botswana Orphan Project, bringing to life Tasha’s original vision and desire to leave the world a more beautiful place. Here is our interview with visionary and design maven, Tasha Kendall.

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